November Designer Newsletter: Indie Design Gift-A-Long (GAL) 2019!

Hi everyone, and happy November!

This month I am back with some information on an event many of you will be interested in: the annual Indie Design Gift-A-Long (or “GAL”). If you’ve been on my mailing list for a while, you’ll have read about the GAL in previous newsletters. However, I wanted to bring attention to it again for those of you who are new to my newsletter. Plus, there are some changes to the eligibility requirements this year, and it’s a time-sensitive topic that I don’t want you to miss out on!

This year designer signups run from November 19th to the 21st, so be sure to check out all the information before then so you don’t miss out.

And as always, I’ve included my tech editing availability for the coming month. Get in touch soon if you’ve got a pattern nearly ready for editing!


The Indie Design Gift-A-Log (GAL) 2019

What is the Indie Design Gift-A-Long?

From the GAL Ravelry group:

“What is Gift-A-Long? It’s a multi-designer promotion to help you kick your holiday gift-making into high gear!

The Indie Design Gift-A-Long is a 5 week long KAL/CAL of holiday gifts made from patterns designed by a rather extensive list of independent designers.”

Basically, participants knit patterns by participating designers, share and chat about their GAL projects on Ravelry and social media, and are entered to win tons of great prizes.

I have participated in the GAL for the past 3 years as a designer, and it’s been such a positive experience.

Who is eligible?

There have been some changes to the eligibility requirements for designers this year. The following information has been taken from this post:

  1. As a result of feedback received after the last year’s GAL, the minimum number of patterns has been increased from 10 to 20. So in order to be eligible to be a participating designer in the GAL this year, you must have 20 self-published, paid (not free) patterns for sale in your Ravelry store.
  2. The expectations regarding pattern quality have also been clarified. The mission of the GAL is to promote the very best in Indie Design, and to raise public perception of its quality. Specifically:
    • Your patterns should be tech edited;
    • Your patterns should have good quality photographs; and,
    • Your patterns should have pricing that reflects the time, effort, and creativity invested in the design and support the indie movement as a whole.

Check out this post for more information.

What does being a “Participating Designer” entail, and what are the benefits?

Basically, you offer between 10 and 20 of your self-published patterns at a discount during the first week of the GAL, donate coupon codes for free pattern downloads to be used as prizes, and generally participate and join in the hype and fun.

Regarding the benefits, it’s a great way to expose your work to more knitters, build your audience, and enjoy a little boost in pattern sales. Plus, it’s a lot of fun. Having enjoyed participating in previous years, I would be disappointed to miss out!

Here are a few stats from last year to give you an idea of the scope of the GAL (taken from this thread on Ravelry):

Check out this thread for lots more stats and fun facts about last year’s GAL.

How can I sign up?

The GAL doesn’t begin until November 26th for regular participants, but chat among organizers and designers in the (impeccably-run, incredibly informative) GAL Planning Ravelry group is in full swing. You can find all important dates, rules, and announcements in this thread. The most important thing to note right now is that if you wish to participate as a designer, the signup window is small and the requirements are both specific and strictly-enforced.

In order to be included as a participating designer, you MUST sign up between 10 am (US EST) on Tuesday, November 19th and 10 am (US EST) on Thursday, November 21st. See this post for all the details on how to sign up and when. There is even a checklist you can use to make sure you are ready to go when sign ups open:

While it’s important to read and follow all the rules, don’t be overwhelmed! The three basic things you must do before you can register are:

  1. Have 20 self-published patterns in your Ravelry shop;
  2. Set up the discount code for the sale period and your individual prize codes; and,
  3. Set up your GAL bundle.

As long as you do these three things (following the guidelines and tutorials here) before November 19th, you’ll be all ready to pull the trigger on signup day.

If you have any questions about the GAL, please don’t hesitate to send me an email! I am not involved with planning the event, but having participated in previous years, I’m sure I can help (or at least point you in the direction of the folks who can).

Tech Editing Availability

I have the following tech editing spaces remaining for November:

November 4th – 8th: 1 space remaining!
November 11th – 15th: 2 spaces remaining!
November 18th – 22nd: 3 spaces
November 25th – 29th: 3 spaces

Reply to this email if you’d like to reserve a spot!

Best,
– Allison


If you find the content I create for this free newsletter to be valuable, please consider buying me a coffee.Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

October Designer Newsletter: Listing Yarn Requirements

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Hi everyone, and happy October! Fall is setting in here in my area of the world and with that comes much more activity in the fibre community. My Instagram feed is becoming flooded with cozy sweaters and warm accessories as designers in the northern hemisphere begin releasing those cold weather patterns they’ve been working on all summer!

Over the coming months, I’m going to be talking about one very specific element of a knitting pattern: the listing of materials. This is something that, while seemingly straightforward, often contains inconsistencies and errors (so much so that it’s too much information to fit into a single newsletter). This month I’ll be covering how to list the yarn required.

And as always, I’ve included my tech editing availability for the coming month. I am booking into the third week of October at the moment, so get in touch soon if you’ve got a pattern nearly ready for editing!


Listing Yarn Requirements

When writing a pattern, including a complete and accurate listing of materials is important because a knitter’s ability to replicate the sample is contingent on having the right tools and materials on hand.

As designers, we want our customers to be happy with the finished product they make from our patterns. In my experience, this is heavily linked to how closely they feel their finished object resembles the sample in the pattern photos.

It seems like it would be fairly easy to indicate what yarn is required for a knitting project, but I see all manner of errors and inconsistencies. From misspelling the dyer/manufacturer to omitting the weight of yarn used in the sample, mistakes and omissions happen surprisingly frequently.

Below I go over what to include in the yarn section of your pattern, some of the most common mistakes I see and address some additional challenges you may encounter.


What to include

When listing the yarn required for a project, it’s important to list the following for each yarn/colour used:

  1. The amount of yarn required, expressed in metres and/or yards, for each pattern size;
  2. The weight of yarn (e.g., Worsted weight);
  3. The fibre content of the yarn used in the sample; and,
  4. Optionally, the exact yarn used in the sample.

Seems simple, right? If it were, I wouldn’t be dedicating a newsletter to the topic. 😉


Common Mistakes

1. Yarn amount listed only in grams and/or ounces

The mass (in grams and/or oz) will only be accurate if the knitter uses yarn with the exact specifications as the one used to knit the sample. You will likely measure the amount of yarn used in your sample by weighing it, but you should convert it to metres/yards when adding the information to your pattern.

For example, if the yarn you used comes in 192 metre/115g skeins and your sample weighs 95g:

192 metres / 115g = 1.66956522 metres per gram
95g (sample weight) x 1.66956522 m/gram = 158.6 metres*

*I should mention that it is common practice to round up (often to the nearest 5 metres/yards) and add a bit of a buffer to ensure the knitter does not run out of yarn. I personally add 10 to 15%, depending on the item, but your mileage may vary.

2. Yarn amount listed only in “number of skeins” of the sample yarn

If you are including the name of the yarn used in the sample, it’s ok to list the number of skeins. However, it’s still best to also include the actual metres/yards required as it makes it easier for the knitter to substitute yarns. I’m sure I’m not the only one who has found themselves standing in a yarn store trying to convert the yarn requirements in a pattern from X skeins of yarn A to Y skeins of yarn B (or to have made a mistake doing so, only to get home and realize I’ve bought too much/too little). Being specific about the amount of yarn will reduce the margin of error.

3. Typos/mistakes in the name/brand/base of the sample yarn

This is one of the most common errors I see. When listing the exact brand/base of yarn used in the sample, be sure to do so accurately. Look at the ball band, manufacturer’s website, and/or the yarn entry on Ravelry to be sure.

For example, based on this yarn entry in Ravelry, how should this yarn be referenced?

Wrong: HypothesisYarns Worsted
Wrong: Hypothesis Yarns worsted

Right: Hypothesis Yarns Worsted

4. Listing the amount and weight of yarn but not the fibre content

Because different fibres behave differently when knit up, a knitter will have a better chance of achieving good results if they choose a yarn with a similar fibre content to what was used in the sample.

For example, if a pattern simply calls for 1000 metres of fingering weight yarn, and the sample was knit with 100% wool, a project knit in cotton will turn out much differently than the sample!

Some knitters will invariably choose to use different fibres, but it’s still best to provide the most complete and accurate yarn information possible.


Other Challenges

Discontinued yarn

It’s disappointing when you spend the time and energy designing a pattern using a particular yarn only to have the yarn discontinued. However, as long as you’ve specified the amount, weight, and fibre content in the pattern, you shouldn’t run into any issues. Even if you have the discontinued yarn listed in your pattern, the knitter should be able to substitute fairly easily if you’ve given them all the right information.

Political affiliation and inclusivity

Now more than ever, consumers are being selective with where they spend their hard-earned (and often scarce) disposable income. They are choosing to support companies whose values are in line with their own, and steering clear of brands that discriminate and don’t value inclusivity.

In the knitting community, there has been a movement towards companies and independent dyers that support and create safe spaces for BIPOC, LBGTQ+, and other marginalized groups. As a designer, what do you do if you’ve used a yarn in a design and you no longer want to support that particular company or dyer?

I am by no means an expert on this topic. It’s also not feasible for me to knit all new samples! However, one thing I have started doing in order to distance myself from brands that I no longer want to support is omitting the yarn company when I talk about the design on social media. It is also on my “to do” list to go through all my patterns and remove those specific yarns from the “Materials” section, leaving only a generic listing of the amount, weight, and fibre content. These are small but important steps I can take to make sure I am not promoting companies and brands I consider harmful, even when I’ve worked with them in the past. Going forward the answer is to be more careful and selective regarding who I work with and whose products I endorse, and to seek out companies and dyers who show their commitment to inclusion.


Tech Editing Availability

I have the following tech editing spots available for October:

  • Sept 30 – Oct 4: all booked up!
  • Oct 7 – 11: 1 spot remaining
  • Oct 14 – 18: 2 spots available
  • Oct 21 – 25: 2 spots available
  • Oct 28 – Nov 1: 3 spots available

Get in touch ASAP if you’d like to reserve a spot!

Best,
– Allison


If you find the content I create for this free newsletter to be valuable, please consider buying me a coffee.Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

September Designer Newsletter: Setting Boundaries

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Hi everyone, and happy September! I hope you’ve had a nice summer. I’ve been trying to get outside as much as possible while the weather is nice, but have also been enjoying getting back down to business. I don’t have kids in school yet, but September always still feels like a fresh start to me!

This month I thought I would talk about something that I’ve been finding more and more important as I return to work: setting boundaries. My time is at such a premium these days that I’ve had to think long and hard about what I want and need (and should) be spending it on, and setting boundaries has been extremely helpful to me.

And as always, I’ve included my tech editing availability for the coming month. As the summer winds down, knitters are reaching for their needles, making this a busy time for designers and tech editors alike. My availability is still fairly limited as I work part-time while taking care of my son. Get in touch soon if you’ve got a pattern nearly ready for editing, as my September spots are already more than half full!


Setting Boundaries

As I have been slowly returning to work, I’ve been trying to find ways to save time and minimize both the amount of time wasted on administrative tasks, and the personal/family time spent distracted by work.

One thing I have realized is that when you are self-employed, and especially when your business is someone else’s hobby, people expect you to be constantly available. On all channels. They expect to be able to DM you on Instagram from their mobile phone on a Sunday afternoon and receive a response within hours. And many of us will respond because it’s convenient, and because we don’t want to let people down. The more frequently you respond to emails and DMs, the more people expect you to be constantly available.

I recently had a customer email me on a Friday night and then follow up within hours when I didn’t respond right away to their pattern support question. I do understand how it happens – they are relaxing at home on a Friday night working on a knitting project and they get stuck, so they reach out for help.

Even so, I have realized that I do not have to be constantly available on every platform to provide good customer service. I get to set the rules. And as long as these rules are clearly communicated, and I follow through and meet the expectations I set, I can still create a positive customer experience without feeling like I am always working. It also helps eliminate distractions, which makes me much more productive (and helpful!) when I am working.

Here are a few things I have done to help set boundaries and be more productive.


1. Turn off notifications for emails and DMs

I actually did this a long time ago for non-urgent emails, and it’s a great first step back from constant availability. For me, there’s nothing more distracting than having emails constantly popping up while you are either a) working on something important or b) enjoying personal or family time.

(If you’re not ready to turn off email notifications, I still recommend muting them while you are working on something that requires your full attention!)

I have actually gone one step further than this and have set up filters so that only urgent emails show up in my inbox. Everything else gets labeled and immediately moved to a folder for me to deal with during the time I set aside to answer emails.

2. Set “office hours”

I have a set time every day when I check/respond to emails. I think of it as “office hours”. The hours are listed on my website, my Ravelry designer page, and in my email auto-responder.

Do I actually check my email more than once a day? Of course. I am frequently going back and forth with designers when I am editing patterns, for example. But I try very hard to limit pattern support and responses to new inquiries to my posted office hours. This is much easier to stick to when notifications are off!

3. Set an email auto-responder

I have an email auto-responder set at all times. This may seem like overkill, but I think it’s a great way to ensure everyone who contacts me knows what to expect. During the week it looks like this:

Then on Friday afternoons, I change it to this:

I have the templates saved in a Google Doc so that on Monday mornings and Friday afternoons I can simply copy and paste the text from the Google Doc to my auto-responder to update it.

4. Specify how you wish to be contacted

Not only do you not have to be available all the time, but you also don’t have to be available via every possible method of communication. For example, it’s ok to specify that you only provide pattern support via email if that’s what works for you. I recently turned off Facebook messages for my business page and instead listed my email address in the “About” section.

Whenever I get pattern support questions on Ravelry or Instagram, I will always ask the knitter to send me an email. This not only helps me stay focused on what I am doing, but it allows me to keep track of requests and make sure nothing falls through the cracks!

5. Set up a specific email address for urgent emails

Before I went on maternity leave, I set up urgent AT kniterations DOT ca. Most people have someone else covering for them while they’re away, but when you’re self-employed you don’t have that luxury. I wanted to be sure that even though I was off, I would see any urgent messages and be able to respond to them quickly. I also wanted to take time fully “off” after my son was born, and didn’t want to feel obligated to respond to non-urgent business.

Setting up a separate “urgent” email address, with those emails forwarded to my personal inbox, gave me peace of mind that I wouldn’t let anyone down. And now that I’m working again, I’m still finding it to be a helpful tool to stay focused and avoid distraction.


It’s important to remember that it’s ok to set boundaries. As long as you set clear expectations, and follow through on what you promise, it’s a great way to avoid distraction, be more productive, and protect your precious personal/family time while still providing great customer service.


Tech Editing Availability

I have the following tech editing spots available for September:

  • Sept 9-13: all booked up!
  • Sept 16-20: 1 spot remaining
  • Sept 23-27: 2 spots available

Get in touch ASAP if you’d like to reserve a spot!

– Allison

Pattern release: Red Cliff Cowl

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The Red Cliff cowl is as lightweight as it is warm. The stranded colourwork pattern creates a dense fabric that blocks out the wind, while the use of fingering weight yarn prevents it from being bulky.

SIZE

One size

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

60 cm/24” circumference, 23.5 cm/9.25” height

MATERIALS

Fingering weight yarn* in the following approximate amounts:

C1 (red): 190 metres/208 yards
C2 (grey): 75 metres/83 yards

*Shown in Tukuwool Fingering (100% Wool; 195 m/213 yd per 50 g/1.76 oz skein) in colours C1: Hohka (H20) and C2: Auri (03).

NEEDLES

One 60 cm/24” circular needle, size 3.75 mm/US 5 (or size needed to obtain gauge in Red Cliff colourwork pattern)
One 60 cm/24” circular needle, size 3.25 mm/US 3 (or two sizes smaller than needed for gauge)

GAUGE

30 stitches & 32 rounds = 10 cm/4” in Red Cliff colourwork pattern, after light wet blocking, on larger needles

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

1 stitch marker, tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✧✧✧

PATTERN NOTES

When working the Red Cliff chart, all stitches are knit using the colours denoted in the chart. The colourwork pattern is worked all the way around the circumference of the cowl.

Red Cliff colourwork pattern is charted only. (no written instructions).

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for release week only! Use coupon code REDCLIFF. Offer ends Saturday, September 7th at midnight PDT. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

Knit Picks Outrageous Insteps eBook Giveaway!

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Hi everyone! I am officially back from maternity leave. While I am focusing mostly on ramping back up the tech editing side of my business to start, I actually had a couple of new patterns published in the Knit Picks Outrageous Insteps collection while I was away (which I shared here on the blog last week). To celebrate, I’m giving away TWO free copies of the collection eBook!

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This collection contains 18 beautiful sock patterns, including Change of Scenery and Straight Arrow by yours truly. It makes a great addition to any sock knitter’s library!

There are TWO chances to win this awesome prize, so make sure you enter on Facebook and Instagram to increase your chances of winning.

Here’s how to enter:

TO ENTER ON FACEBOOK:
1. Like the Kniterations Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/kniterations
2. Leave a comment on this post

TO ENTER ON INSTAGRAM:
1. Follow @Kniterations on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kniterations/
2. Leave a comment on this photo

Tell me who you’d knit either pattern for, what Knit Picks yarns and colours you’d use, anything at all!

Contest closes Thursday, August 29th at midnight and winners will be announced the following day.

Be sure to add the patterns to your Ravelry favourites or queue by visiting the pattern pages: Straight Arrow and Change of Scenery.

Good luck and happy knitting!

– Allison

New Pattern: Change of Scenery (plus an upcoming giveaway!)

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Change of Scenery is designed to make the most of colorful yarns with lots of dimension. Centered increases and decreases separate alternating columns of Garter and Stockinette Stitch, creating a zig-zag effect.

SIZE

Adult S/M [Adult M/L]

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

19 [23.5] cm/7.5 [9.25]” leg circumference,
18.5 [23.5] cm/7.25 [9.25]” foot circumference

MATERIALS

Knit Picks Stroll Tonal (75% Merino, 25% Nylon; 422 m/462 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in Cold stream (203497); 1 skein

NEEDLES

One set 2.25 mm/US 1 needles* (or size needed to obtain gauge)

*Either one set of DPNs, two circular needles, or one long circular needle, as you prefer for small circumference knitting in the round.

GAUGE

42 stitches & 44 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Texture Pattern, after blocking
32 stitches & 48 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in stockinette stitch, after blocking

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Tapestry needle, scrap yarn or stitch holder, stitch markers

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✧✧✧

PATTERN NOTES

This pattern is worked cuff-down with the Change of Scenery Texture pattern worked all the way around the leg and continuing onto the instep. The sole is worked in Stockinette Stitch. A classic heel flap and gusset ensure a great fit.

Available in Knit Picks Outrageous Insteps Collection, which is on sale now in both hard copy and eBook format from the Knit Picks website. The Change of Scenery pattern is also available on its own here.

Be sure to add the pattern to your Ravelry favourites or queue by visiting the pattern page here.

Also, visit the Kniterations Facebook page and Instagram feed next week for details on how to enter to win one of two copies of this beautiful collection.

New Pattern: Straight Arrow (plus an upcoming giveaway!)

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Straight Arrow is a colorwork sock pattern that lets the yarn shine. The main portions of the leg and foot, as well as the Straight Arrow motif, are worked in a subtle, speckled yarn. The cuff, short row heel, toe, and the background of the colorwork band are worked in a vibrant contrast color that makes the hues pop.

SIZE

Adult S [M, L]

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

18 [20.5, 23] cm/7 [8, 9]” leg and foot circumference

MATERIALS

MC: Knit Picks Hawthorne Speckle Hand Paint (80% Superwash Fine Highland Wool, 20% Polyamide (Nylon); 326 m/357 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in Confetti Speckle (26870); 1 skein
CC: Knit Picks Hawthorne Fingering Kettle Dye (80% Superwash Fine Highland Wool, 20% Polyamide (Nylon); 326 m/357 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in Delphinium (26694); 1 skein

NEEDLES

One set 2.25 mm/US 1 needles* (or size needed to obtain plain stockinette stitch gauge)
One set 3 mm/US 2.5 needles* (or size needed to obtain stranded stockinette stitch gauge)

*Either one set of DPNs, two circular needles, or one long circular needle, as you prefer for small circumference knitting in the round.

GAUGE

32 stitches & 48 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in stranded stockinette stitch in the round on larger needles (suggested size 3 mm/US 2.5), after blocking
32 stitches & 48 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in plain stockinette stitch on smaller needles (suggested size 2.25 mm/US 1), after blocking

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Tapestry needle, scrap yarn or stitch holder, stitch markers

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✧✧✧

PATTERN NOTES

These socks are worked top down from the cuff and the colourwork pattern is fully charted.

Available in Knit Picks Outrageous Insteps Collection, which is on sale now in both hard copy and eBook format from the Knit Picks website. The Straight Arrow pattern is also available on its own here.

Be sure to add the pattern to your Ravelry favourites or queue by visiting the pattern page here.

Also, visit the Kniterations Facebook page and Instagram feed next week for details on how to enter to win one of two copies of this beautiful collection!

Pattern release: Intercoastal

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Intercoastal is a bulky weight hat pattern with infinite colour possibilities. The simple geometric colourwork pattern is easy to follow and lets the yarn shine, making it perfect for specialty and hand-dyed skeins. Pair a variegated yarn with a solid for a subtle contrast that breaks up the colour changes in the yarn, or use two solids for a more striking look.

From east to west, Intercoastal will keep your head warm all the way from Cape Spear to Port aux Basques through the wildest Newfoundland weather!

SIZE

Youth [Adult S/M, Adult M/L] to fit 49.5 [54.5, 59] cm/19.5 [21.5, 23.25]” head circumference

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

48.5 [53.5, 58] cm/19 [21, 22.75]” circumference, 24.5 [25, 25.5] cm/9.75 [9.75, 10]” height

Because of the fabric density created by the colourwork pattern, this hat does not have much stretch and is therefore intended to be worn with only a small amount of negative ease (approximately 1 cm/0.5”). If in between sizes, choose the smaller size.

MATERIALS

Bulky weight yarn* in the following approximate amounts (not including optional pom pom):

C1 (Siren): 81 [91, 100] metres/89 [100, 109] yards
C2 (Cream): 18 [21, 23] metres/20 [23, 25] yards

*Shown in Hypothesis Yarns Bulky (100% Merino; 100 m/109 yd per 100g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Siren (C1) and Estelle Yarns Alpaca Merino Chunky (60% Alpaca, 40% Merino; 125 m/137 yd per 100g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Cream/201 (C2).

NEEDLES

Size A (for colourwork body)

One 40 cm/16” circular needle, size 5.5 mm/US 9 (or size needed to obtain gauge in Intercoastal colourwork pattern)

Size B (for crown decreases)

One set DPNs, size 5 mm/US 8 (or one size smaller than Size A)

Size C (for brim)

One 40 cm/16” circular needle, size 4.5 mm/US 7 (or two sizes smaller than Size A)

GAUGE

16.5 stitches & 20 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Intercoastal colourwork pattern, after wet blocking, on Size A needles

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

8 stitch markers (1 unique, 7 matching), tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✧✧✧

PATTERN NOTES

Intercoastal colourwork pattern is charted only (no written instructions).

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for release weekend only! Use coupon code INTERCOASTAL. Offer ends Sunday, January 27th at midnight PST. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

January Designer Newsletter: Designer Resource Roundup

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Hi everyone, and happy new year! As mentioned in my December newsletter, I will be going on maternity leave soon. I have included the timeline below.

For January’s newsletter, I’ve decided to do a roundup of previous topics I’ve covered. I hope having all these resources linked in one place will be helpful. I’ll be back with brand new content in April or May, so if you have suggestions for future newsletters, please send them along at any time!

I have also been busy fitting in as many of your beautiful patterns for editing as I can, and all remaining tech editing spots are now full. If you’re in need of a tech editor while I’m away, please send me an email and I’ll refer you to a trusted colleague. I am planning on returning to work in late April/early May, and will notify this list when I have settled on a date.


Maternity Leave

Here is my tentative timeline:

January 4th, 2019: Deadline for booking new tech editing jobs

All spaces have been spoken for. If you’ve got a pattern ready for editing, please send me an email and I will refer you to a trusted colleague.

January 18th, 2019: Deadline for receiving revised versions of jobs-in-progress

Any outstanding follow-up tasks related to previously booked work (2nd edits, final looks at previously edited patterns, etc.) will need to be received by this date.

February 3rd, 2019: Invoices for outstanding work go out

Invoices for any work completed up to this point will be sent out.

Late April/Early May 2019: Return to work (limited availability)

I plan to start taking on jobs again in late April/early May, with increasing availability in the months that follow. I will notify this list when I have settled on a date.
I will be checking my main email, allison AT kniterations DOT ca, once a week while away. Urgent inquiries can be addressed to urgent AT kniterations DOT ca.


Resource Roundup

It’s hard to believe this newsletter is a year and a half old! Below are links to all the topics I’ve covered. I’ve included links to the original emails, plus links to accompanying blog posts, where available. I’ve also listed them both chronologically and then organized them into categories for easy searching. Enjoy!

Chronological listing

2017

August – Sock design resources: email
September – Indicating stitch count changes: email | blog post
October – Writing patterns with both charts and written instructions: email | blog post
November – Sending single-use Ravelry coupon codes with MailChimp: email | blog post
December – Submitting patterns to third parties for publication: email | blog post

2018

January – Using checklists for repetitive tasks: email | blog post
February – Online resources for pattern writing and design: email | blog post
March – Promoting your patterns: email
April – Building your email list: email | blog post
May – Diversifying your income: email
June – GDPR going forward: email | blog post
July – Top 10 pattern mistakes and how to avoid them: email | blog post
August – 10 Apps to help streamline your design workflow: email | blog post
September – How to give your pattern a unique, memorable name: email | blog post
October – No newsletter
November – Indie Design Gift-A-Long (GAL) 2018: email | blog post
December – Ravelry Pro – Beyond the basics: email | blog post

Listing by category

Pattern writing and design

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Tech Editing Availability

As mentioned above, my remaining tech editing spots have all been filled. If you’d like to be referred to a trusted colleague of mine, please send me an email.

I hope you have a creative and productive few months and I look forward to working with you again when I return.

Best,
– Allison

Pattern re-release: Daya

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Columns of stockinette emerge from plush garter stitch to create the unique combination cable on this versatile headband. Requiring just one skein of super bulky weight yarn and an hour of knitting time, this quick knit makes a great gift. Knit it in a neutral to go with anything, or in something bold to add a pop of colour.

This headband is knit flat from end to end. A provisional cast on allows the ends to be grafted together seamlessly.

SIZE

One size (Adult)

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

46 cm/18” circumference, 13 cm/5” at widest point, 9.5 cm/3.75” at narrowest point, after grafting

MATERIALS

Approximately 40 m/44 yd super bulky weight yarn

Shown in Knit Picks Tuff Puff (100% Wool; 40 m/44 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Celestial (26845).

NEEDLES

One set 10 mm/US 15 needles* (or size needed to obtain gauge)

*Either one set of straight or circular needles, as you prefer for flat knitting. If using a circular needle, an additional needle will be needed to hold the provisional cast on stitches for grafting.

GAUGE

9 stitches & 17 rows = 10 cm/4″ in Garter Stitch, after blocking

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Cable needle, tapestry needle, scrap yarn, additional circular needle for grafting (optional; not required if knitting with straight needles)

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✧✧✧

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for re-release week only! Use coupon code DAYA. Offer ends Saturday, December 22nd at midnight PST. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


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