Pattern release: Intercoastal

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Intercoastal is a bulky weight hat pattern with infinite colour possibilities. The simple geometric colourwork pattern is easy to follow and lets the yarn shine, making it perfect for specialty and hand-dyed skeins. Pair a variegated yarn with a solid for a subtle contrast that breaks up the colour changes in the yarn, or use two solids for a more striking look.

From east to west, Intercoastal will keep your head warm all the way from Cape Spear to Port aux Basques through the wildest Newfoundland weather!

SIZE

Youth [Adult S/M, Adult M/L] to fit 49.5 [54.5, 59] cm/19.5 [21.5, 23.25]” head circumference

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

48.5 [53.5, 58] cm/19 [21, 22.75]” circumference, 24.5 [25, 25.5] cm/9.75 [9.75, 10]” height

Because of the fabric density created by the colourwork pattern, this hat does not have much stretch and is therefore intended to be worn with only a small amount of negative ease (approximately 1 cm/0.5”). If in between sizes, choose the smaller size.

MATERIALS

Bulky weight yarn* in the following approximate amounts (not including optional pom pom):

C1 (Siren): 81 [91, 100] metres/89 [100, 109] yards
C2 (Cream): 18 [21, 23] metres/20 [23, 25] yards

*Shown in Hypothesis Yarns Bulky (100% Merino; 100 m/109 yd per 100g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Siren (C1) and Estelle Yarns Alpaca Merino Chunky (60% Alpaca, 40% Merino; 125 m/137 yd per 100g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Cream/201 (C2).

NEEDLES

Size A (for colourwork body)

One 40 cm/16” circular needle, size 5.5 mm/US 9 (or size needed to obtain gauge in Intercoastal colourwork pattern)

Size B (for crown decreases)

One set DPNs, size 5 mm/US 8 (or one size smaller than Size A)

Size C (for brim)

One 40 cm/16” circular needle, size 4.5 mm/US 7 (or two sizes smaller than Size A)

GAUGE

16.5 stitches & 20 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Intercoastal colourwork pattern, after wet blocking, on Size A needles

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

8 stitch markers (1 unique, 7 matching), tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

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PATTERN NOTES

Intercoastal colourwork pattern is charted only (no written instructions).

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for release weekend only! Use coupon code INTERCOASTAL. Offer ends Sunday, January 27th at midnight PST. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

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January Designer Newsletter: Designer Resource Roundup

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Hi everyone, and happy new year! As mentioned in my December newsletter, I will be going on maternity leave soon. I have included the timeline below.

For January’s newsletter, I’ve decided to do a roundup of previous topics I’ve covered. I hope having all these resources linked in one place will be helpful. I’ll be back with brand new content in April or May, so if you have suggestions for future newsletters, please send them along at any time!

I have also been busy fitting in as many of your beautiful patterns for editing as I can, and all remaining tech editing spots are now full. If you’re in need of a tech editor while I’m away, please send me an email and I’ll refer you to a trusted colleague. I am planning on returning to work in late April/early May, and will notify this list when I have settled on a date.


Maternity Leave

Here is my tentative timeline:

January 4th, 2019: Deadline for booking new tech editing jobs

All spaces have been spoken for. If you’ve got a pattern ready for editing, please send me an email and I will refer you to a trusted colleague.

January 18th, 2019: Deadline for receiving revised versions of jobs-in-progress

Any outstanding follow-up tasks related to previously booked work (2nd edits, final looks at previously edited patterns, etc.) will need to be received by this date.

February 3rd, 2019: Invoices for outstanding work go out

Invoices for any work completed up to this point will be sent out.

Late April/Early May 2019: Return to work (limited availability)

I plan to start taking on jobs again in late April/early May, with increasing availability in the months that follow. I will notify this list when I have settled on a date.
I will be checking my main email, allison AT kniterations DOT ca, once a week while away. Urgent inquiries can be addressed to urgent AT kniterations DOT ca.


Resource Roundup

It’s hard to believe this newsletter is a year and a half old! Below are links to all the topics I’ve covered. I’ve included links to the original emails, plus links to accompanying blog posts, where available. I’ve also listed them both chronologically and then organized them into categories for easy searching. Enjoy!

Chronological listing

2017

August – Sock design resources: email
September – Indicating stitch count changes: email | blog post
October – Writing patterns with both charts and written instructions: email | blog post
November – Sending single-use Ravelry coupon codes with MailChimp: email | blog post
December – Submitting patterns to third parties for publication: email | blog post

2018

January – Using checklists for repetitive tasks: email | blog post
February – Online resources for pattern writing and design: email | blog post
March – Promoting your patterns: email
April – Building your email list: email | blog post
May – Diversifying your income: email
June – GDPR going forward: email | blog post
July – Top 10 pattern mistakes and how to avoid them: email | blog post
August – 10 Apps to help streamline your design workflow: email | blog post
September – How to give your pattern a unique, memorable name: email | blog post
October – No newsletter
November – Indie Design Gift-A-Long (GAL) 2018: email | blog post
December – Ravelry Pro – Beyond the basics: email | blog post

Listing by category

Pattern writing and design

  • How to give your pattern a unique, memorable name: email | blog post
  • Indicating stitch count changes: email | blog post
  • Online resources for pattern writing and design: email | blog post
  • Sock design resources: email
  • Top 10 pattern mistakes and how to avoid them: email | blog post
  • Writing patterns with both charts and written instructions: email | blog post

Tech tips

Business growth

Organization

Other


Tech Editing Availability

As mentioned above, my remaining tech editing spots have all been filled. If you’d like to be referred to a trusted colleague of mine, please send me an email.

I hope you have a creative and productive few months and I look forward to working with you again when I return.

Best,
– Allison

Pattern re-release: Daya

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Columns of stockinette emerge from plush garter stitch to create the unique combination cable on this versatile headband. Requiring just one skein of super bulky weight yarn and an hour of knitting time, this quick knit makes a great gift. Knit it in a neutral to go with anything, or in something bold to add a pop of colour.

This headband is knit flat from end to end. A provisional cast on allows the ends to be grafted together seamlessly.

SIZE

One size (Adult)

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

46 cm/18” circumference, 13 cm/5” at widest point, 9.5 cm/3.75” at narrowest point, after grafting

MATERIALS

Approximately 40 m/44 yd super bulky weight yarn

Shown in Knit Picks Tuff Puff (100% Wool; 40 m/44 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Celestial (26845).

NEEDLES

One set 10 mm/US 15 needles* (or size needed to obtain gauge)

*Either one set of straight or circular needles, as you prefer for flat knitting. If using a circular needle, an additional needle will be needed to hold the provisional cast on stitches for grafting.

GAUGE

9 stitches & 17 rows = 10 cm/4″ in Garter Stitch, after blocking

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Cable needle, tapestry needle, scrap yarn, additional circular needle for grafting (optional; not required if knitting with straight needles)

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✧✧✧

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for re-release week only! Use coupon code DAYA. Offer ends Saturday, December 22nd at midnight PST. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

December Designer Newsletter: Ravelry Pro – Beyond the basics

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Hi everyone, and happy December! I’ve got a lot to cover this month, so I’ll get right to it:

  • We’re expecting! Information on my upcoming maternity leave.
  • This month’s designer topic: Selling patterns on Ravelry using Ravelry Pro – some new/niche features you may not know about!
  • My tech editing availability for December and January.

Maternity Leave

I have some news to share this month, along with my usual newsletter content and availability. My husband and I are expecting our first child in February, and I’ll be taking a short maternity leave in the new year. I will be in touch with current clients directly with more details, but I thought it would be helpful to keep you all in the loop so that you know what to expect while I’m away.

Here is my tentative timeline (subject to change; babies tend to be a little unpredictable 😉):

January 4th, 2019: Deadline for booking new tech editing jobs

I am accepting new tech editing jobs until January 4th for spaces up to and including the following week (January 7th – 11th). Inquiries about booking new jobs after this date will be passed along to a trusted colleague of mine who has agreed to take care of my clients while I am away. I have expanded availability in December and January so I hope to be able to accommodate as many of you as possible before I leave.

January 18th, 2019: Deadline for receiving revised versions of jobs-in-progress

Any outstanding follow-up tasks related to previously booked work (2nd edits, final looks at previously edited patterns, etc.) will need to be received by this date.

February 3rd, 2019: Invoices for outstanding work go out

Invoices for any work completed up to this point will be sent out.

Late April/Early May 2019: Return to work (limited availability)

I plan to start taking on jobs again in late April/early May, with increasing availability in the months that follow.

I will be checking my email once a week while away in order to respond to any urgent inquiries.


Ravelry Pro: Beyond the basics

Ravelry Pro, much like Ravelry itself, has more features than I could ever use, as a knitter or a designer. Outside of the basics (which I won’t get into here – most of you are Ravelry pattern shop veterans), there are tons of features and customizations you can use to maximize your use of Ravelry Pro. The team at Ravelry are always listening to user feedback and tweaking features so that they more accurately reflect the way users actually use the site.

Here are some of my favourite new/lesser-known features of Ravelry Pro:

1. Save money on PayPal fees by using a “micropayment” account.

When you sell patterns through Ravelry, all payments are processed through PayPal. When you use a regular PayPal business account to receive payment for Ravelry pattern sales, PayPal charges you 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction. With a micropayment account, the fee is 5% plus $0.05 per transaction.

This works out such that for transactions less than $12 (i.e. most Ravelry pattern sale transactions), you pay less in fees with a micropayment account. For transactions of more than $12, fees will be lower when using a regular business account.

Ravelry Pro allows you to link both types of PayPal accounts, ensuring you will always be paying the lowest PayPal fee amount possible. It can be configured so that payments under a certain amount go into your micropayment account, and payments over a certain amount go into your regular account (the default is the optimal $12 threshold). This guarantees that you are always paying the smallest PayPal fee percentage on each and every transaction.

All you have to do is create a new business PayPal account, phone PayPal and ask to have the rate on your new account changed to the micropayments rate, then add your new account to the “configure store” section of Ravelry Pro.

1b

2. Link testers’ projects to your pattern before it is published

Yes, Ravelry Pro now allows you to link tester projects to a pattern while it is still in “draft” status! Many pattern customers like to browse linked projects before purchasing a pattern, and now you can be sure there are projects associated with your pattern from the moment it is published (instead of having to notify testers after publication in hopes they will be quick to link their projects).

To take advantage of this small but incredibly useful new feature, make sure you create your pattern in Ravelry Pro a few days in advance of your scheduled publication date and save it as a draft. You will notice a new section in the “add new pattern” wizard called “Testing”. All you need to do is fill out the information in this section and pass the Tester Code along to your testers. They’ll be able to enter the code into their project’s “Pattern Name” field to link their project to your draft pattern, and you’ll be able to see a list of linked projects! Then once the pattern goes live, all those projects will be visible on the pattern’s “Projects” tab.

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3. Make the most out of coupon codes

I could write an entire newsletter about the versatility of Ravelry coupon codes and how to use them. For now, I will just highlight a few new (and exciting) features that I am enjoying!

i. Generating coupon codes before a pattern is published

Until recently, when setting up unique, single-use coupon codes, you had to set up your offer terms when you created the promotion. So if you wanted to create a percentage discount coupon, you would need to select the eligible patterns at the time you created the promotion.

For me, the problem with this workflow was that when I wanted to set up a percentage discount coupon code for my mailing list in advance of a pattern release, my yet-unpublished-pattern wouldn’t be available to select from the list, so I would have to make the coupon code valid for another pattern (or, *gasp*, all my patterns!) and then remember to go back and add the correct pattern to the promotion before activating it once the pattern was published. While this workaround wasn’t *terrible*, it wasn’t ideal, either.

Ravelry Pro now allows you to generate the codes without specifying the offer terms in advance. This means you can set up the rest of the promotion details (such as the start and end times and other requirements), and even generate the coupon codes themselves before the pattern is published without having to fake which patterns the promotion applies to.

ii. Creating coupon codes exclusive to Patreon subscribers

This one is a bit of niche integration, but I know at least a few of you have creator accounts on Patreon, so I thought it was worth including.

You can now create promotions that are limited to Patreon supporters. You can even specify the tier level(s) for which the promotion is valid!

As a Patreon creator, I was struggling to find a way to provide pattern rewards to my supporters in a way that was convenient for my patrons, convenient for me, and didn’t require too much admin/maintenance.

First, I tried simply uploading the pattern PDF to a post on my creator page that was visible to the tier levels entitled to the reward (this is how Patreon recommends providing rewards). However, as a Ravelry user, I knew that personally, I would much prefer to have patterns delivered through Ravelry so that I could re-download them from my library whenever I liked without having to worry about saving (and keeping track of) the PDF files on my computer. I then tried just creating a regular coupon code and only sharing it on Patreon. This solved the Ravelry library issue, but I was afraid the code would get shared with non-subscribers. Next I tried generating unique coupon codes and emailing/messaging them to my supporters individually. This solved both the Ravelry library and sharing issues, but was too labour-intensive.

Now that Patreon creators can link their Patreon accounts to Ravelry, both of my problems have been solved. I can create a single coupon code, post it to Patreon (or anywhere!) and only users who support me on Patreon can use it. This is another seemingly minor improvement to Ravelry Pro that has drastically improved my workflow and saved me tons of time.

3b

One last thing. If you have any questions about Ravelry Pro, the Ravelry Shopkeepers group forum is a wealth of information. There are lots of knowledgable Ravelers that will answer questions, plus Ravelry staff monitors the forum and contribute regularly!


Tech Editing Availability

I have expanded availability in December and January as I prepare for my maternity leave. Get in touch if you’d like to reserve a spot as they are bound to fill up quickly!

December
December 3rd – 7th: 4 spaces
December 10th – 14th: 6 spaces
December 17th – 21st: 6 spaces
December 24th – 29th: Off for Christmas holidays!

January
December 31st – January 4th: 8 spaces
January 7th – 11th: 8 spaces

Send me an email (allison at kniterations dot ca) if you’d like to reserve a spot!

Best,
– Allison

Pattern release: Red Cliff Mittens

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The Red Cliff mittens are as lightweight as they are warm. The stranded colourwork pattern creates a dense fabric that blocks out the wind, while the use of fingering weight yarn prevents them from being bulky.

The colourwork pattern is worked on both the palm and back of the hand, as well as across the thumb gusset. Because it is both vertically and horizontally symmetrical, it flows seamlessly up the outside of the thumb and cleverly down the inside of the thumb using a section of horizontally mirrored charts.

SIZE

Child [Adult S, Adult M, Adult L]  to fit 14 [16.5 ,19, 21.5] cm/5.5 [6.5, 7.5, 8.5]” hand circumference

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

16.5 [19, 21, 23.5] cm/6.5 [7.5, 8.25, 9.25]” hand circumference (measured at knuckles), height is adjustable

Because of the dense colourwork pattern, these mittens do not have much stretch and are therefore intended to be worn with a small amount of positive ease. For the best fit, choose a size that is approximately 2 to 2.5 cm/0.75 to 1” larger than the wearer’s hand circumference.

MATERIALS

Fingering weight yarn* in the following approximate amounts:

C1 (red): 151 [180, 211, 250] metres/165 [197, 231, 273] yards
C2 (grey): 51 [61, 70, 84] metres/56 [67, 77, 92] yards

*Shown in Tukuwool Fingering (100% Wool; 195 m/213 yd per 50 g/1.76 oz skein) in colours C1: Hohka (H20) and C2: Auri (03).

NEEDLES

One set 2.75 mm/US 2 needles* (or size needed to obtain gauge in Red Cliff colourwork pattern)

One set 2.25 mm/US 1 needles* (or two sizes smaller than needed for gauge)

*Either one set of DPNs, two circular needles, or one long circular needle, as you prefer for small circumference knitting in the round.

GAUGE

36 stitches & 34 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Red Cliff colourwork pattern, after light wet blocking, on larger needles

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

3 stitch markers (including 1 unique for BOR), removable stitch markers (2 in different colours), tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✦✧✧

Version 2

Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for re-release weekend only! Use coupon code RED-CLIFF-MITTENS. Offer ends Monday, December 3rd at midnight PST. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

 

November Designer Newsletter: Indie Design Gift-A-Long (GAL) 2018!

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Hi everyone, and happy November! My monthly designer newsletter went out yesterday, and in it I provided some information on an event many of you will be interested in: the annual Indie Design Gift-A-Long (or “GAL”). Signups run between November 14th and 16th, so be sure to check out all the information before then so you don’t miss out.

And as always, I included my tech editing availability for the coming month. Get in touch soon if you’ve got a pattern nearly ready for editing!


The Indie Design Gift-A-Log (GAL) 2018

What is the Indie Design Gift-A-Long?

From the GAL Ravelry group:

“What is Gift-A-Long? It’s a multi-designer promotion to help you kick your holiday gift-making into high gear!

The Indie Design Gift-A-Long is a 6 week long KAL/CAL of holiday gifts made from patterns designed by a rather extensive list of independent designers.”

Basically, participants knit patterns by participating designers, share and chat about their GAL projects on Ravelry and social media, and are entered to win tons of great prizes.

I have participated in the GAL for the past 2 years as a designer, and it’s been such a positive experience.

What does being a “Participating Designer” entail, and what are the benefits?

Basically, you offer between 10 and 20 of your self-published patterns at a discount during the first week of the GAL, donate coupon codes for free pattern downloads to be used as prizes, and generally participate and join in the hype and fun.

Regarding the benefits, it’s a great way to expose your work to more knitters, build your audience, and enjoy a little boost in pattern sales. Plus, it’s a lot of fun. Having enjoyed participating in previous years, I would be devastated to miss out!

Here are a few stats from last year to give you an idea of the scope of the GAL (taken from this thread on Ravelry):

Check out this thread for lots more stats and fun facts about last year’s GAL.

How can I sign up?

The GAL doesn’t begin until November 23rd for regular participants, but chat among organizers and designers in the (impeccably-run, incredibly informative) GAL Planning Ravelry group is in full swing. You can find all important dates, rules, and announcements in this thread. The most important thing to note right now is that if you wish to participate as a designer, the signup window is small and the requirements are both specific and strictly-enforced.

In order to be included as a participating designer, you MUST sign up between 10 am (US EST) on Wednesday, November 14th and 10 am (US EST) on Friday, November 16th. See this post for all the details on how to sign up and when. There is even a checklist you can use to make sure you are ready to go when sign ups open:

While it’s important to read and follow all the rules, don’t be overwhelmed! The three basic things you must do before you can register are:

  1. Have 10 self-published patterns in your Ravelry shop;
  2. Set up the discount code for the sale period and your individual prize codes; and,
  3. Set up your GAL bundle.

As long as you do these three things (following the guidelines and tutorials here) before November 14th, you’ll be all ready to pull the trigger on signup day.

If you have any questions about the GAL, please don’t hesitate to send me an email at allison at kniterations dot ca. I am not involved with planning the event, but having participated in previous years, I’m sure I can help (or at least point you in the direction of the folks who can).

Tech Editing Availability

I have the following tech editing spaces remaining for November:

November 5th – 9th: full!
November 12th – 16th: 1 space remaining!
November 19th – 23rd: 4 spaces
November 26th – 30th: 5 spaces

Send me an email (allison at kniterations dot ca) if you’d like to reserve a spot!

Best,
– Allison

Pattern re-release: Powder

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Chunky, soft, and quick to knit, Powder features Fisherman’s Rib stitch, which puffs up the already plump yarn. The ribbed stitch pattern alternates to create a natural brim in the fabric. This hat can be styled as a slouch or a beanie – and don’t forget the pom pom!

This hat is worked in the round from the bottom up.

SIZE

One size (Adult)

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

51 cm/20” circumference and 23.5 cm/9.25” tall

MATERIALS

Approximately 160 m/175 yd super bulky weight yarn

Shown in Cascade Yarns Boliviana Bulky (100% merino wool; 160 m/175 yd per 200 g/7 oz skein) in colour Silver (07); 1 skein.

NEEDLES

One each 40 cm/16” circular needle and set of DPNs*, size 8 mm/US 11 (or size needed to obtain gauge)

*Or preferred style for small circumference knitting in the round

GAUGE

8 stitches & 24 rounds* = 10 cm/4″ in Fisherman’s Rib, after blocking

*When counting rounds in Fisherman’s Rib, one visible round is formed over two worked rounds. Therefore, each visible, counted round counts as two rounds for gauge.

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Stitch markers (1 unique, 3 matching), tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✦✧✧

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for re-release weekend only! Use coupon code POWDER. Offer ends Monday, October 22nd at midnight PDT. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

Pattern re-release: Frost

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The Frost mittens, inspired by classic Scandinavian motifs, feature a large Nordic star, bands of colourwork, and a lining for extra warmth. Worked in Icelandic Lettlopi, these mittens will keep your fingers toasty from the winter solstice to the spring equinox.

These mittens are worked from the cuff up with thumb gussets. The outer mitten is worked first, then stitches are picked up around the inside of the cuff and the lining is worked in the opposite direction. Once completed, the lining is tucked into the outer mitten.

SIZING

Size

Adult S/M [Adult M/L] to fit 19 [21] cm/7.5 [8.25]” hand circumference as measured at the knuckles

Sample shown is Adult M/L

Finished Dimensions

18.5 [20.5] cm/7.25 [8]” inner circumference, 21 [23] cm/8.25 [9]” outer circumference, 21 [23.5] cm/8.25 [9.25]” hand length, 26.5 [29] cm/10.5 [11.5]” total length

Choose a size with a finished inner circumference approximately 0.5 cm/0.25” smaller than the wearer’s actual hand circumference. This ensures the lining will fit snugly.

MATERIALS

Worsted weight yarn in the following amounts:

C1 (blue): 124 [150] m/136 [165] yd
C2 (beige): 61 [73] m/67 [80] yd
C3 (red): 97 [117] m/107 [128] yd

Shown in Ístex Léttlopi (100% Icelandic wool; 100 m/109 yd per 50g/1.75 oz ball) in colours C1: Ocean Blue (9419), C2: Light Beige Heather (0086), C3: Crimson Red (9434)

NEEDLES

One set 4 mm/US 6 needles*
One set 5 mm/US 8 needles*
Or sizes needed to obtain gauge

*Either one set of DPNs, two circular needles, or one long circular needle, in each size, as you prefer for small circumference knitting in the round.

GAUGE

23 stitches & 24 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Frost pattern, after wet blocking, on larger needles
20 stitches & 29 rounds = 10 cm/4” in Stockinette Stitch, after wet blocking, on smaller needles

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Stitch markers (1 unique, 4 matching), removable stitch markers (3), waste yarn or stitch holder, tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✦✧✧

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for re-release weekend only! Use coupon code FROST. Offer ends Monday, October 1st at midnight PDT. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

New Pattern: Eversweet

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Eversweet margarine, produced and distributed only in Newfoundland (in Canada’s first margarine manufacturing plant), was a staple in many Newfoundland homes before the plant in St. John’s was closed in 2004. Grandmothers across the province undoubtedly still have some of the signature bright yellow tubs squirrelled away for storing everything from sewing supplies to leftovers.

The sample was knit in a vibrant yellow reminiscent of its namesake’s iconic yellow packaging (so iconic you’ll find the logo on t-shirts, in artwork, and even painted on garbage cans). The two-round pattern repeat is easily memorized, making for great TV knitting. Eversweet looks great in solid and tonal yarns, or in a self-striping colourway for a zig zag effect.

SIZING

Size

Child [Adult S, Adult M, Adult L] to fit 18 [20.5, 23, 25.5] cm/7 [8, 9, 10]” foot circumference as measured at the widest part of the foot

Finished Dimensions

16.5 [19, 21.5, 24] cm/6.5 [7.5, 8.5, 9.5]” leg and foot circumference, length is customizable

Choose a size with a finished foot circumference approximately 1.5 cm/0.5” smaller than the wearer’s actual foot circumference. See Construction Notes, page 3, for more detailed information on sock sizing.

MATERIALS

One* 385 m/420 yd skein fingering weight yarn

*Some foot lengths may require more than one skein

Shown in Log House Cottage Yarns Squishy Sock (80% Extra Fine Merino Wool, 20% Nylon; 385 m/420 yd per 114 g/4.02 oz skein) in the Simply Speckled Dark Collection (medium yellow); 1 skein.

NEEDLES

One set 2.25 mm/US 1 needles* (or size needed to obtain gauge)

*Either one set of DPNs, two circular needles, or one long circular needle, as you prefer for small circumference knitting in the round.

GAUGE

42 stitches & 46 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Eversweet Pattern
32 stitches & 48 rounds = 10 cm/4” in Stockinette Stitch

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Stitch markers (1 unique, 2 matching), waste yarn or stitch holder, tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✦✧✧

CONSTRUCTION NOTES

These socks are worked from the cuff down in the round with a Modified Eye of Partridge heel flap and gusset.

The Eversweet Pattern is a relatively dense stitch pattern. As a result, the stitch counts for each size are higher than would normally be used for fingering weight socks, and they are worn with less ease. Be sure to select a size based on the sizing information given.

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for release weekend only! Use coupon code EVERSWEET. Offer ends Monday, September 10th at midnight PDT. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

 

How to give your pattern a unique, memorable name

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Happy September everyone! It’s hard to believe that summer is almost over. For us in the knitwear industry, though, autumn is the best time of the year. The temperatures outside start to cool, and knitters start itching to cast on for warm woolies (yes, there are apparently knitters who don’t knit in the summer).

This is also the time of year when I get flooded with beautiful new designs in need of tech editing, so I’m thinking this month’s newsletter topic will be particularly timely.

When I’m trying to come up with interesting topics for my designer newsletter, I always go through a couple of questions in my head. Is there something specific I’ve helped someone with recently that they seemed to really find useful? What are the common mistakes I see over and over again? What do my clients seem to be struggling with? Well, this month I’m going to address something I struggle with as a designer: coming up with “good” names for my patterns. Read on for some tips and tricks for finding unique, memorable pattern names.

And as always, I’ve included my tech editing availability for the coming month. Over half of my September spots are already booked up, so get in touch soon if you’ve got a pattern nearly ready for editing!


Giving Your Pattern a Unique, Memorable Name

Naming my patterns is one of my least favourite parts of knitwear design. Sure, sometimes the name just comes to me in a eureka moment when I’m creating the design. Sometimes the name even comes first! But when it doesn’t, finding a “good” name can be difficult.

In my opinion, a “good” pattern name is memorable and unique, without being overly complicated. A unique name will stick in people’s minds, but you want it to be simple enough that they can easily go search for it – and find it – if they forgot where they saw/heard about the pattern.

Sounds like a tall order, and it can be, but for me, coming up with a “good” pattern name boils down to the following two steps:

  1. Brainstorming a list of quality possibilities
  2. Deciding on one that’s reasonably unique

1. Brainstorming a list of quality possibilities

If you’re having trouble coming up with a name for a pattern, start by doing a major brainstorming session. Write EVERYTHING down. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Draw from the pattern’s inspiration. 

    This may seem obvious, but think back to what inspired the pattern to begin with. Where did the idea come from? What else were you doing, or what were you thinking about, when you were developing it?

    Example: My Digger hat pattern was inspired by a stitch pattern I saw on the sweater of a character on Gilmore Girls. The character? Jason “Digger” Stiles. I didn’t really intend to name the pattern after him, but when I thought back to the pattern’s inspiration and development, I couldn’t get away from him!

  • Draw inspiration from the pattern itself.

    Again, this might sound obvious, but if the pattern hasn’t told you its name yet, look closer. Does the stitch pattern resemble anything in nature? Does the colour of the yarn remind you of anything? What properties does the fabric or the finished object have?

    Example: My Little Heart’s Ease mitten pattern. As I was knitting, I kept thinking how the pink colourwork pattern looked like little hearts, and Little Heart’s Ease is the name of a beautiful little community on Trinity Bay in Newfoundland.

  • Browse dictionary/thesaurus websites.

    Look back at all the words and ideas you wrote down while brainstorming.  For each word, think of every related word you can come up with, and write those down, too. Once you’ve got a long list of related words, start looking for synonyms and idioms related to those words (check out my two favourite online thesauruses here and here). You might start with a relatively generic word and stumble across a neat synonym or interesting idiom related to it that would make a great pattern name.

    The Free Dictionary has a great idiom finder that I find really helpful.

    Example: When trying to come up with a name for my In a Fog mitts, I couldn’t get past the fact that when the stitch pattern was worked in a solid and a speckled colourway it looked a bit blurry, or “foggy”. “Foggy” didn’t seem like a great name, but when I typed “fog” into the idiom finder I immediately saw “in a fog” and knew it was perfect.

2. Deciding on one that’s reasonably unique

So you’ve come up with something you think will make a great pattern name. Not so fast! Before you commit, I recommend doing a search for it on Ravelry. While the name doesn’t have to be totally unique, you don’t want to end up on the 6th page of search results when a knitter goes to look it up. I like to use names that have less than a full page of results so that my pattern will end up on page 1 when someone searches for the name.

If you type in your favorite contender and end up with 15 pages of results, don’t get discouraged! This a great time to head back to the idiom finder or a thesaurus to look for less common variations.


As with most tasks, having a method and a basic set of guidelines can help make pattern-naming a bit less daunting. I hope you find my suggestions helpful.

Do you have any tricks you use for coming up with great pattern names? Leave a comment or send me a message to let me know!


Tech Editing Availability

I have the following tech editing spaces remaining for September:

September 3rd – 7th: full!
September 10th – 14th: full!
September 17th – 21st: 1 space remaining!
September 24th – 28th: 5 spaces

Send me an email at allison AT kniterations DOT ca you’d like to reserve a spot!

Best,
– Allison