Common pattern mistakes and how to avoid them

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Hi everyone! My July Designer Newsletter went out this morning. I had a very busy month of tech editing in June and it got me thinking about some of the common pattern mistakes I tend to see over and over again. In my newsletter this month, I shared the list I compiled, in hopes that I can help you ensure your pattern is in the best possible shape when you send it to me for editing. A more polished pattern takes less time to edit which means lower tech editing costs for you!

And as always, I included my tech editing availability for the coming month. I’m already fully booked for this week and nearly fully booked next week, but I have some spots available during the rest of July. Get in touch soon (fill out the form on this page) if you’ve got a pattern nearly ready for editing!


Common pattern mistakes and how to avoid them

As a tech editor, I see it all. From having no yarn listed to forgetting to bind off, I’ve seen every pattern mistake under the sun. But that’s ok! Everyone is human, and this is why you hire an editor. However, the better shape your pattern is in when you send it to me, the more quickly it can be edited, which helps keep your tech editing expenses down.

Lately, I’ve been seeing a lot of the same avoidable issues over and over again, so I thought it would be a good opportunity to compile a list to share with you. If you’ve made these mistakes before, don’t worry! I’ve made many of them myself in my own patterns. My goal here is to help you make sure your pattern is in the best possible shape before you send it for tech editing.

1. Lack of consistency in measurements, unit conversions, and rounding

I didn’t know there were so many different ways to calculate/convert/round measurements until I became a tech editor.

Do you calculate both the imperial and metric measurements directly from your gauge? Or do you calculate all your measurements first in inches and then convert to cm? If you do it the second way, do you convert to cm before rounding your inch measurements, or afterward? Do you use 1″ = 2.5 cm, or 1″ = 2.54 cm? Do you round inches to 0.25″ and cm to 0.5 cm, or do you use a different way of rounding?

I won’t get into the pros and cons of each, but I will say that no matter which method(s) you use, it should be done consistently throughout the pattern. When I plug your stitch/row counts and gauge into my spreadsheet, I should be able to reproduce your measurements consistently to a fraction of a unit using the same formula.

2. Abbreviations list is not accurate

Your abbreviations list should contain all the abbreviations used in the pattern – nothing more, nothing less. It also helps to have things alphabetized (easier for the knitter to look things up, quicker for me to verify).

3. Needles list is not accurate

As with the abbreviations list, the needles section should contain all the needle sizes and styles required. Everything in this list should be referenced at some point in the pattern, and every needle referenced in the pattern should be included in this list.

Also, if your pattern calls for circular needles, be sure to include the cable length as well as the needle size. If cable length isn’t important, it’s still helpful to include a minimum size that will work.

4. Tools/notions list is not accurate

This list should always contain the basics (e.g, tapestry/yarn needle for weaving in ends), but often designers will use a template, or copy and paste this section from another pattern, and forget to update it. Does the knitter need stitch markers, buttons, blocking tools, waste yarn, etc.? If they do need stitch markers, how many? Do they need different colours/styles to mark different pattern elements? Be specific.

5. Using “Row” and “Round” incorrectly

Flat knitting instructions should reference “rows”, and circular knitting instructions should reference “rounds”. This goes for pattern instructions AND gauge. A simple find and replace in your word processor can help you easily verify you are using these terms correctly.

6. Forgetting to label the RS and WS for flat knitting

This should be done for at least the first two rows, although you can get away with just labeling the first RS row. If you follow these row instructions with something like “work Rows X-Y Z times”, I also recommend indicating RS and/or WS again on the next row.

7. Neglecting to denote stitch count changes.

Most patterns have increases and decreases that change the stitch count and it’s helpful to provide knitters with stitch count information so that they can be sure that they haven’t made a mistake. It also helps me verify that the instructions and stitch patterns that follow will work over the new stitch count(s).

How to indicate the stitch count change depends on the type of instruction:

  • When an instruction is worked only once, include the new stitch count. The new stitch count is by far the most useful piece of information to give the knitter when the instruction is worked just once.
  • When an instruction is repeated later in the pattern, include the number of stitches increased or decreased. When you want to repeat the same increase or decrease instruction more than once, the new stitch count total is only accurate the first time the instruction is worked. For this reason, including the number of stitches increased or decreased becomes more useful (and correct).
  • When an instruction is repeated a fixed number of times, include both. If an instruction (or group of instructions) containing an increase or decrease is repeated a fixed number of times before moving on, you can include the number of stitches increased or decreased in the line-by-line instructions, and then list the new total stitch count at the end.

Confused? I blogged about this topic back in 2017, including examples: Indicating Stitch Count Changes

8. Including charts but not telling the knitter how/when to use them

My clients will tell you that I am a vocal advocate for writing patterns from a neutral point of view.

This means that when including two representations of the same information (i.e. charts and written instructions to represent a single stitch pattern) I always recommend designers write the pattern in a neutral way so that the knitter can follow the pattern from start to finish regardless of the representation they choose.

At the very least, it should be obvious how each representation can be used by the knitter. I often see patterns written from start to finish, and then charts are included at the end, seemingly as an afterthought, with no indication of which part of the written pattern they can be used to replace.

I actually created a resource to help explain this concept, so if you’re interested in learning more, you can click here to download the PDF: Writing patterns with both charts and written instructions.

9. Key pattern elements missing

Omitting key elements of a pattern is more common than you would think. When you’re knitting your cuff-down sock sample, you *know* you’ll be closing the toe using Kitchener Stitch, but it’s one of those things that’s so obvious that it’s easy to forget to write it down. Here are a few of the most common offenses I see:

  • Components missing (needles, yarn, gauge, abbreviations, sizes, finished measurements, etc.)
  • Yarn listed, but actual amounts required not given
  • Actual garment elements missing (sleeves, heels, thumbs, etc).
  • Finishing instructions missing (binding off, Kitchener Stitch, weaving in ends, blocking, etc.)

10. Yarn names styled incorrectly

When listing an actual brand name of yarn, it’s important to style the name the way the dyer or yarn company does. This not only helps knitters locate the correct yarn, but it’s respectful to the dyer/yarn company to write their name exactly as they prefer to have it written. Plus, misspellings of brand names and companies look unprofessional!


Would you believe me if I said this is just scratching the surface? In all seriousness, I want to repeat that if you are guilty of any of these common mistakes, please don’t feel bad! I have done many (ok, most) of them myself in my own patterns, especially when I was starting out. We’re all human, and this is why you hire an editor.


Tech Editing Availability

I have the following tech editing spaces remaining for July:

July 2nd – 6th: full!
July 9th – 13th: 1 space remaining!
July 16th – 20th: 4 spaces
July 23rd – 27th: 6 spaces
July 30th – August 3rd: 6 spaces

Fill out the form here if you’d like to reserve a spot!

Best,
– Allison

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New Pattern: Walter

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Walter is a sweet, colour-blocked baby blanket with endless colour combination possibilities. The geometric motif is a neutral choice for any baby, making this blanket a great shower gift for parents-to-be. Worked in a soft, superwash wool for both warmth and ease of care, Walter is a great size for cribs, bassinets, and strollers.

SIZE

One size

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

67 x 90 cm/26.5 x 35.5”, after wet blocking

MATERIALS

Worsted weight yarn in the following approximate amounts:
C1 (White): 355 m/388 yd
C2 (Navy): 470 m/514 yd
C3 (River Rock): 120 m/131 yd

Shown in Cascade 220 Superwash (100% Wool; 201m/220 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in colours C1: White (871), C2: Navy (854), and C3: River Rock (874).

NEEDLES

One set 5 mm/US 8 needles* (or size needed to obtain gauge)

*Either one long circular needle (cable length at least 80 cm/32”) or one set of straight needles, as you prefer for flat knitting.

GAUGE

18 stitches & 36 rows = 10 cm/4″ in Garter Stitch

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Tapestry needle, blocking wires and pins (optional)

SKILL LEVEL

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CONSTRUCTION NOTES

This blanket is worked in four pieces. Each piece consists of four triangles that are joined seamlessly by picking up stitches. The pattern contains a schematic that gives a visual representation of how each triangle is picked up and worked. The pieces are then blocked and seamed together using a type of Mattress Stitch for Garter Stitch seams.

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for release weekend only! Use coupon code WALTER. Offer ends Monday, July 2nd at midnight PDT. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

GDPR: Staying on top of data privacy going forward

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My June designer newsletter went out today, and in it I talked a little bit about GDPR. Hear me out! Yes, May 25th has come and gone. But there are still things you will need to do regularly to stay compliant, and I’ve put together a list containing some tips and tricks that will help you out going forward.


GDPR – going forward!

You’ve written your Privacy Policy and your Terms & Conditions, you’ve made sure your email marketing signup forms are airtight, and you have proof of consent for all your subscribers. Great! You don’t have to worry about all this GDPR stuff anymore, right? Wrong.

GDPR is not a diet, but a lifestyle change, and I’ve put together a list of some tips and tricks to help you stay compliant (and avoid falling off the wagon!).

1. Be careful when changing your signup forms

I’m not saying you can never change your signup forms, but keep in mind that you need proof of consent from all your subscribers. Depending on the email marketing provider you use, if you modify your current signup forms instead of creating new ones, you may not have a record of the particular version of the signup form each subscriber used. This means you won’t be able to prove they consented (actively and explicitly) to receiving emails from you, which violates the GDPR.

2. Keep your Data Map up to date

A Data Map is a list of all the data you process. It includes the source of the data, what is being collected, the reason for collecting it, how it is processed, and how long it is kept. An accurate Data Map is crucial to developing a solid Privacy Policy; it allows you to explain to your customers exactly how and why you collect and use their data.

One thing you will need to do going forward is to keep your Data Map up to date. Whenever you add any new services/methods/reasons for collecting data, you will need to update your Data Map and the relevant sections of your Privacy Policy to reflect those changes.

EXAMPLE: Let’s assume you had previously been using your website/blog for your own personal posts but wanted to start posting contributor content, interviews, etc. If you hadn’t been publishing user content in the past, you might not have a section of your Privacy Policy dedicated to “publication data”. What are you allowed to do with the user content? Will you only be publishing it on your blog, or will you be cross-posting to social media? Etc. All of this will need to be defined in your Data Map and added to your Privacy Policy before you start collecting and posting the content.

Here is the GDPR Data Map Template I used: https://medium.com/@Ideea/gdpr-data-map-template-31da34ca39d0

3. Re-evaluate your Privacy Policy and Terms & Conditions

You will likely be updating your Privacy Policy and Terms & Conditions regularly as your business changes. In addition, you will want to sit down and re-evaluate them from time to time to make sure you haven’t missed anything, revisit some items that may or may not be working for you, etc. Personally, I don’t trust myself to remember to do this on-the-fly every time something changes, so I set a reminder to periodically re-evaluate my policies from start to finish.

4. Run a quarterly re-engagement campaign.

Many of us ran permission-passing campaigns in the GDPR lead-up in order to ensure we had proof of active and explicit consent from all our subscribers. Some people have felt disappointment at losing subscribers, while others are embracing their lean, engaged new lists!

I have been trying to focus on the latter. You get better conversion rates when your list is engaged, and who wants to pay their email marketing provider for subscribers who never open emails (and will likely never become customers)? Plus, if GDPR has taught me anything, it’s that the less personal data I have access to, the better.

So with that in mind, another piece of the GDPR fallout puzzle for me is to do a better job of keeping my list trim, clean, and engaged. Lots of marketers run “re-engagement campaigns” every 90 days or so, and I think it’s a great way to keep on top of things. Many email providers can even send an email automatically once a contact has been inactive for a specified period of time. I’m sure you’ve gotten emails like these, with subjects like “We miss you!” or “It’s been a while!”. There are some great examples in this HubSpot post. I especially like Lowes’ approach, which focuses on what’s new and exciting, and what unengaged subscribers are missing out on!

Then, if the subscriber doesn’t engage with your re-engagement campaign, you can remove them from your list.

5. Update your passwords regularly

Before GDPR came into effect, I went down through my Data Map, identified every application I use to process customer data, and changed all the passwords. It was a lot of passwords (everything from Facebook to Paypal), but creating my Data Map really drilled home to me just how much customer data I have at my fingertips, and how irresponsible (not to mention unlawful) it would be to have any of it compromised by weak device or application passwords.

Don’t worry, you don’t have to remember them all; I use Keeper to generate and save secure passwords for all my devices and applications.


I hope this was helpful. I’ve added repeating tasks/reminders in my system so that I don’t have to rely on my brain to remember to do these things consistently going forward.

Also, I should state that none of the content of this blog post constitutes legal advice (if you’ve read my Terms & Conditions, you’ll know that 😉) and that following any or all of my suggestions will not guarantee GDPR compliance. These are just a few tips and tricks that I’ve found helpful.


I also included my tech editing availability for the coming month. I have the following spaces remaining for June:

June 4th – 10th: 1 space remaining!
June 11th – 17th: 5 spaces
June 18th – 24th: 5 spaces
June 25th – July 1st: 6 spaces

Get in touch if you’d like to reserve a spot!

Best,
– Allison

New Pattern: Whitecap

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Whitecap is a basic sock pattern with a few figurative and literal twists. The twisted stitches, which resemble whitecaps on the water, slant in opposite directions. The left sock is worked solely with left twists, and the right sock is worked solely with right twists, creating a mirrored effect. The pattern is both engaging and easily memorized, with four knit “rest” rounds between twists, and works well with solid, semi-solid, tonal, and variegated sock yarns.

These socks are worked from the cuff down in the round with a Modified Eye of Partridge heel flap and gusset.

SIZING

Size

Adult sizes S [M, L] to fit 19.5 [22.5, 25] cm/7.75 [8.75, 9.75]” foot circumference as measured at the widest part of the foot

Finished Dimensions

18 [20, 22] cm/7 [7.75, 8.75]” leg circumference, 17.5 [20, 22.5] cm/7 [7.75, 8.75]” foot circumference, length is customizable

Choose a size with a finished foot circumference approximately 10% smaller than the wearer’s actual foot circumference.

MATERIALS

One* 405 m/445 yd skein fingering weight yarn

*Some foot lengths may require more than one skein

Shown in Manos Del Uruguay Alegria (75% Wool, 25% Polyamide; 405 m/445 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Nickel (A2530); 1 skein.

NEEDLES

One set 2.25 mm/US 1  needles* (or size needed to obtain gauge)

*Either one set of DPNs, two circular needles, or one long circular needle, as you prefer for small circumference knitting in the round.

GAUGE

36 stitches & 52 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Whitecap Pattern
32 stitches & 48 rounds = 10 cm/4” in Stockinette Stitch

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Stitch markers (1 unique, 2 matching), waste yarn or stitch holder, tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✦✧✧

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for release weekend only! Use coupon code WHITECAP. Offer ends Monday, June 4th at midnight PDT. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

Building your email list

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Back in April, my monthly Designer Newsletter contained some information on how to build your email list. With all the new GDPR regulations coming into effect today (and our lists taking a sizable hit from the resulting permission passing campaigns), I thought it would be a great time to re-share this information. I’ve tweaked it a little to include GDPR-specific information, as well. I hope you find it helpful!


Your email list contains your biggest fans – these are the people who have chosen to receive communication from you and are interested in what you have to offer. If you’ve recently run a permission passing campaign to ensure your list complies with the new GDPR data protection regulations, this is especially true! Most marketing folks will agree that a healthy email list with a good conversion rate is so much more valuable than a bloated list containing subscribers who never open your emails (let alone purchase from you).

So now that I’ve convinced you that you need an email list (and you do!), how do you build it? Building your list is an ongoing project that you will want to work at consistently.

Keep in mind that when using any of the methods described below, if you have subscribers in the EU (and most of us do), you must make sure you are compliant with the GDPR. I am not a lawyer, nor a GDPR expert, but for the purposes of sending emails, this basically means:

  • You must receive explicit and active consent to email your subscribers, and
  • You must only send the types of emails that people have consented to receive.

So, with GDPR in mind, here are a few things I have done that have helped me grow my list significantly since I started it two years ago:

1. Create an incentive for opting in

  • This should be something relevant and valuable to your followers and fans.
  • For the design section of my list (i.e. the group of subscribers interested in me as a designer), I offer a free pattern, but a coupon code could also work.
  • With respect to the GDPR, you cannot simply collect email addresses from the people who download your opt-in incentives and then send them marketing emails. They must explicitly and actively consent to receive the types of emails you wish to send.

2. Talk about your list

  • People can’t sign up for your list if they don’t know you have one, and won’t sign up for your list if they don’t know what kinds of email you send! So be sure to talk about your list on social media.
  • A great time to do this is in the leadup to a pattern release, especially if you give your subscribers an exclusive discount.
  • Again, with respect to the GDPR, your signup forms must explicitly state the types of emails you will be sending (and if you will be sending more than one type, subscribers must be able to select only the ones they want to receive). You cannot ask people to sign up to receive knitting tutorials and then send them marketing emails, for example.

3. Make your list easy to find

  • Anyone who finds you anywhere should be able to join your list quickly and easily!
  • Add it to your social media profiles, add a signup form to your website, and even include the link directly in your pattern PDFs.

I hope this was helpful and that the information will assist you in building your list and attracting more potential customers who will love your patterns.

And if you haven’t started an email list yet, I hope you will be motivated to create one! Try not to be intimidated – remember that the people who sign up for your list are the people who *want* to hear from you! Plus, both MailerLite and MailChimp have “forever free” plans for small lists, so you can try out a couple of different platforms before committing to a paid option. These providers also both have tools and tutorials in place to help you ensure you are GDPR-compliant (I use MailerLite and highly recommend it).

Disclaimer: I am neither a lawyer nor a GDPR expert. Whether or not you administer an email list, I highly recommend familiarizing yourself with the GDPR and how it affects small businesses. The ramifications extend well beyond email list administration, and well beyond the scope of the simplified examples I’ve included above. Here are a few resources that may help:

GDPR and How Compliance Can Improve Your Email Marketing
Peace of Mind about the GDPR
GDPR: Simple 6 Step Checklist

– Allison

New Pattern: Wreckhouse Headband

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Wreckhouse is an area of Newfoundland named for its extreme winds. While the Newfoundland Railway was still in operation, the winds would occasionally blow railway cars off the tracks, and to this day transport trucks are still blown off the road from time to time.

The Wreckhouse headband is knit in thick, dense, Honeycomb Brioche Stitch, making it a stylish but also truly functional winter accessory. The honeycomb pockets trap warm air, making this headband an effective barrier against the briskest of winter winds.

SIZE

One size

Shown in size M with 4 cm/1.5” negative ease.

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

45.5 cm/18” circumference and 14 cm/5.5” width

MATERIALS

120 m/131 yd worsted weight yarn

Shown in Cascade Yarns 220 Heathers (100% Wool; 201 m/220 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Rainier Heather (9454).

NEEDLES

One set size 4 mm/US 6 needles* (or size needed to obtain gauge)

*40 cm/16” circular needle or set of straight needles as you prefer for flat knitting

GAUGE

18 stitches & 22 rows = 10 cm/4″ in Honeycomb Brioche Stitch, after blocking

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Tapestry needle, removable stitch markers (2; optional)

SKILL LEVEL

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for release weekend only! Use coupon code WRECKHOUSE. Offer ends Sunday, April 29th at midnight PDT. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


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The Wreckhouse collection is now available as an eBook! This means:


Kniterations is on Patreon!become_a_patron_button

Pattern re-release: In Transit

My In Transit hat, which was first published in February 2017 in Knotions, is now available as a FREE digital download! Scroll down for all the details.

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In Transit is a basic hat with a clever, transitional colourwork pattern. The zigzag colourwork is based on a simple, two-colour salt and pepper fair isle pattern. Working the pattern over an odd number of stitches hides the jog that naturally occurs when knitting stranded colourwork in the round; a seemingly simple detail that provides polished results!

In Transit can be worked in two highly contrasting colours that stand out, or in two similar colours for a more subtle look.

SIZE

Adult size S/M [M/L]

Shown in size M/L with no ease for a relaxed, slouchy fit. For a snugger fit, choose a size with about 2.5 – 4 cm/1 – 1.5” negative ease.

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

52 [56] cm/20.5 [22]” circumference, 23 [23.5] cm/9 [9.25]” height

MATERIALS

Cascade 220 Heathers* (100% Wool; 201m/220 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in colours 7803 Magenta (C1), 1 skein, and 8011 Aspen Heather (C2), 1 skein.

*Or similar worsted weight yarn.

NEEDLES

Size A (for single-colour stockinette stitch)

One 40 cm/16” circular needle and one set DPNs, size 4 mm/US 6 (or size needed to obtain single-colour stockinette gauge)

Size B (for Zigzag Pattern)

One 40 cm/16” circular needle, size 4.5 mm/US 7 (or size needed to obtain Zigzag Pattern gauge)

GAUGE

22 stitches & 26 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Zigzag pattern after blocking
22 stitches & 28 rounds = 10 cm/4” in single-colour stockinette stitch, after blocking

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Stitch markers, including one in a unique colour to mark the beginning of round, tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

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Price: FREE!

Available for download through my Ravelry shop.

New Pattern: Brier

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The Brier cowl is a basic cowl with a few clever touches that make it special. Knit mostly in squishy Garter Stitch, columns of slipped stitches add an element of style and also hide the jog that usually occurs when working both Garter Stitch and stripes in the round. The stripes follow the Fibonacci sequence; this provides a clever transition from one colour to the next and makes room for experimentation with different colour combinations.

SIZE

One size

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

57 cm/22.5” circumference and 26.5 cm/10.5” height

MATERIALS

Bulky weight yarn in the following approximate amounts:
C1: 90 m/98 yd
C2: 90 m/98 yd

Shown in Estelle Yarns Alpaca Merino Chunky (60% Superfine Alpaca, 40% Merino Wool; 125 m/137 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in colours C1: Teal (219) and C2: Mid Grey Heather (225); 1 skein each.

NEEDLES

One 60 cm/24” circular needle, size 6 mm/US 10 (or size needed to obtain gauge)

GAUGE

14 stitches & 30 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Garter Stitch, after blocking

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Stitch markers (1 unique, 3 matching), tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✧✧✧✧

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for release weekend only! Use coupon code BRIER-15 at checkout. Ends Sunday, April 1st, 2018 at 23:59:59 PDT. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.

New Pattern: Wreckhouse Hat

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Wreckhouse is an area of Newfoundland named for its extreme winds. While the Newfoundland Railway was still in operation, the winds would occasionally blow railway cars off the tracks, and to this day transport trucks are still blown off the road from time to time.

The Wreckhouse hat is knit in thick, dense, Honeycomb Brioche Stitch, making it a stylish but also truly functional winter accessory. The honeycomb pockets trap warm air, making this hat an effective barrier against the briskest of winter winds.

SIZE

Adult size S [M, L]

Shown in size M with 4 cm/1.5” negative ease.

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

45.5 [50.5, 56] cm/18 [20, 22]” circumference and 23.5 [24, 25] cm/9.25 [9.5, 9.75]” height

MATERIALS

154 [174, 201] m/168 [190, 220] yd worsted weight yarn

Shown in Cascade Yarns 220 Heathers (100% Wool; 201 m/220 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Rainier Heather (9454); 1 skein.

NEEDLES

Size A (for Honeycomb Brioche Stitch body)

One each  40 cm/16” circular needle and set of DPNs*, size 4 mm/US 6 (or size needed to obtain gauge)

*Or preferred style for small circumference knitting in the round

Size B (for Brioche Stitch brim)

One 40 cm/16” circular needle, size 3.75 mm/US 5 (or one size smaller than Size A)

GAUGE

15 stitches & 26 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in Honeycomb Brioche Stitch, after light blocking

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Stitch markers (2), tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✦✧✧

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Price: $7.00 CAD 15% off for release weekend only! Use coupon code wreckhouse-web at checkout. Or get 25% off both patterns in the Wreckhouse Collection (scroll down to see how)! promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.


eBook (email)

The Wreckhouse collection is now available as an eBook! This means:

New Pattern: Digger

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At first glance, Digger is a basic garter stitch hat with a contrasting texture panel, but don’t be fooled; this piece contains a few clever details that make it special. Instead of plain 1×1 rib, the brim is worked in a tidier Slipped Stitch Rib pattern. Two slipped stitch columns flow from the ribbing to border the texture panel, eliminating the jog that usually occurs when knitting garter stitch in the round.

Digger is a versatile pattern and can be knit with a small amount of negative ease (1.5 – 2.5 cm/0.5 – 1”) to be worn as a fitted toque, or with more ease (2.5 – 5 cm/1 – 2”) to be worn slouchy as modeled.

SIZE

Adult size S [M, L]

Shown in size L with 1.5 cm/0.5” negative ease for a slouchy fit. For a snugger fit, choose a size with more negative ease.

FINISHED DIMENSIONS

43.5 [49, 54.5] cm/17.25 [19.25, 21.5]” circumference and 24 [24.5, 25.5] cm/9.5 [9.75, 10]” height

MATERIALS

108 [124, 144] m/118 [136, 157] yd bulky weight yarn*

*Shown in Estelle Yarns Alpaca Merino Chunky (60% Superfine Alpaca, 40% Merino Wool; 125 m/137 yd per 100 g/3.53 oz skein) in colour Mid Grey Heather (225); 1 [1, 2] skein(s).

NEEDLES

Size A (for body)

One each size 40 cm/16” circular needle and set of DPNs, size 6 mm/US 10 (or size needed to obtain gauge)

Size B (for ribbing)

One 40 cm/16” circular needle, size 5.5 mm/US 9 (or one size smaller than Size A)

GAUGE

14.25 stitches & 28 rounds = 10 cm/4″ in garter stitch*
16 stitches & 28 rounds = 10 cm/4” over texture panel*
*Measured after gentle blocking

ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Stitch markers (2), tapestry needle

SKILL LEVEL

✦✦✧✧✧

Version 2

Price: $6.50 CAD 15% off for release weekend only! Use coupon code digger-web at checkout. promo has ended

Available through my Ravelry store or directly via PayPal by clicking the “buy now” button below.